Manthan 2017: Day 2: Guest Lecture 2: “How to analyse an investment idea- A true life example”- Mr.Ravi Sundaram, Senior Development Manager, iNautix Technoogies India Pvt Ltd.

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Mr. Ravi S. started the discussion by quoting “Don’t invest for the sake of making money, but to gain an understanding of the market.” By taking the example of the pharmaceutical sector he is closely associated to, he explained concentrated vs. diversified portfolio. According to him, all guidelines need to be strictly followed while considering each of them.

He went on to explain the process related details while making investments. He mentioned that the duration depends on the nature of the investments. The holding period depends on the nature of stocks you are holding in the firm. Right issue needs to be carefully considered while going through with the decision. He further elaborated the investment decisions by citing an example of the life cycle of the drug which goes through various stages namely pre-clinical, clinical, NDA Review, Post marketing, launch, generic.

He went on to explain the road ahead for the pharmaceutical sector, through which he explained the important considerations like “Am I paying too much?.” Here, we mentioned that more than numbers, judgment and expertise matter while making investments.

While considering investments in a start-up, sustenance with consistency is a takeaway. He also explained few standpoints including government’s involvement in policy making. He said that the government looks at it holistically, not based on individual investor’s interest.

He also explained certain concerns while making investment decisions, few of which include life cycle phase wherein it possibly still be in early investment phase involving high R&D cost. Management’s strategy of in-organic growth, low tax%- take has its subsidiaries in countries where they book R&D expenses and outspoken management i.e. the number of media interactions include some of the other concerns. He ended the discussion by quoting wise quoting as an requisite to good investment decisions.

Maneeshi 2017: Day 2: Panel Discussion- “Corporate Entrepreneurship”

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The 8 Panelists along with the Moderator, Prof. Ishwar Haritas, shared their thoughts on the topic “Corporate Entrepreneurship”.

Prof. Sushil, Chair Strategic Management Group, DOMS, IIT Delhi

Prof. Sushil said that Corporate Entrepreneurship is an ambiguous area. He took the analogy of Alice in Wonderland and students going to industrial wonderland. He believes that to be an individual entrepreneur or be it in corporate entrepreneurship, most important aspect is to have a vision as to where to reach. He further stated that corporate entrepreneurship contributes only to certain areas for competitiveness and took Indian illustrations such as HCL, Kinetic, and ITC. He concluded with the mantra “To give a LIFE (Learning, Innovation, Flexibility, and Entrepreneurship) to your organization

Mr. T V Ganesh, CEO, Indiaproperty.com

Mr. Ganesh stated that the fundamental problem running a company or encouraging innovation is-How to let people think within a frame of mind with nothing to lose. He continued that there is an absence of structured framework where employees would be allowed to make mistakes, helping encourage a culture of risk-taking and innovation. He quoted that “Challenge today is to set up an environment to encourage such risk-taking.”

Mr. Srinivas Prasad, Head, Gravitas Advisory

Mr. Srinivas Prasad stated that not all entrepreneurship comes internally, but might also come externally like in the case of CISCO, Intel and Google capital. He added that large companies are looking at accelerators to come up with new ideas for business which help them to stay in touch with disruptions.

Mr. Rohit Rao, Director, Grant Thorton

Mr. Rohit Rao started off by stating that corporate entrepreneurship depends on the kind of organization you are from and the onus is on the company to constantly innovate. He defined the values to be CLEAR- Collaboration, Leadership, Egility, Ability, and Respect. He also commented that the bigger a company gets, more the probability of lethargy to creep in. He believes it is important to foster right talent in terms of encouraging entrepreneurship.

Mr. Vaitheeswaran, Speaker, Angel Investor, Mentor

Mr. Vaitheeswaran said that Corporate entrepreneurship is the fashion in the fag, it will follow a similar trajectory like the start-ups. There is a need to corporates to venture into entrepreneurship to keep up with the competitiveness. He even mentioned that the biggest challenge is the unwillingness of corporates to invest their funds in innovative ideas due to the risks. He believes that the culture of an organization makes a difference in the success of corporate entrepreneurship.

 Mr. Darshan Doshi, Head Program Reliance Jio GenNext Hub

Mr. Darshan Doshi believes that the technology front and talent pool play the main role in corporate entrepreneurship. One should be willing to take ownership and adapt new technologies to grow in the market. The purpose of every entrepreneur within and outside an organization is to find the market need. He said that we need to identify and solve the problem. He concluded by saying that an organization’s returns should be exponential after executing an action plan.

Mr. Manish Harodia, Co-founder, and Head of Marketing & Sales, DreamWallets

Mr. Manish started the discussion by stating that the learning in one month of entrepreneurship is equal to the two years spent in a B- School case study methodology. According to him, entrepreneurship is a multiplier of an idea, product, team, and execution. The success of any business depends on the timing of the market. It is the deciding factor for the success of any idea. He shared his thoughts on how demonetization gave rise to many whacky ideas. Individuals with such ideas are influencing big enterprises to change the way organizations are working. He emphasized on idea generation and implementation.

Mr. Saumyajit Guha, Co-Principal, Jaarvis Accelerator

Mr. Saumyajit Guha started the discussion by citing examples in solving problems innovatively in the corporate world. According to him, the manner in which a problem is solved leads to corporate innovation. He said that an entrepreneur is comparatively more free to take risks and launch a new product or service unlike the corporate. This is because of the accountability and ownership factor which is lacking in the corporate. The challenge in the corporate is the job mentalities of the employees, which plays a major role in the execution of successful operations.

Maneeshi: Inauguration Ceremony

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Maneeshi the first installment held in T. A. Pai Institute of Management was inaugurated on the 28th of January. This initiative is launched by Omega, the consultancy wing and SEG, the social endeavour group of TAPMI. The theme of the event is “Entrepreneurship as Competitiveness”. This captures the true spirit of the entrepreneur scene currently prevalent in the country. The ceremony started with the invocation song and lighting of the lamp.

Professor Gururaj Kidyoor, the Director at TAPMI opened the inauguration by introducing the theme to the present guests, faculty and students. He feels that when we think of a start-up or a new entrepreneurship initiative we only think of e-commerce. The other sectors are not given the due weightage or importance because of the lack of knowledge or awareness. He concluded by saying the events like Maneeshi explore other avenues which emphasize on social transformation and not just to feed in consumerism.

Prof Kidyoor welcomed the chief guest of the event Mr Gautam Pai, Managing Director of Manipal Technologies, onto the stage to give his views. He explained that a country like India had a huge potential given the vast talent pool and the major social issues awaiting a simple solution. But he feels the major problem lies in the fact that there is taboo for a business failing. This mentality forms a major block because for higher risk one needs to take higher returns. He went on to explain the various reasons that India is an open playing field for start-ups because of the various problems awaiting a simple solution.

The inauguration ceremony came to an end with exciting events lined up. The panelists and participants for these events geared up for the three day event. The first of its kind, Maneeshi holds a promising and eventful journey for all the guests, faculty and students.

“Creating an ecosystem for everyone to participate”, Mr Mohan Narayana swamy, Managing Director and Chief Operating Officer, iNautix

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In an interactive session with students Mr Mohan Narayanaswamy, MD and Chief Operating Officer, iNautix spoke about building an ecosystem which creates a platform for everyone to participate. This is an era of disruptions, and it is surprising to see how rapidly the underlining fabric around us is changing. Today organizations like YouTube, Google develop the best product and make it open source, enabling others to benefit from their platform. As future leaders, it is essential for us to be adaptive towards this change and have a broader perspective. Technology is a major driver of this change but it is just an enabler.

He spoke about how our generation is facing the highest level of volatility that has existed till now. The volatility of the time calls for agility in our models as well as our people. Our business models should be agile enough to accept this change. Companies should strive towards creating an ecosystem which provides a platform where everyone has an opportunity to participate. The key to creating agile models is to remove the friction. According to him, our systems should be designed to be fault tolerant.

Moving further, he spoke about how iNautix is trying to create a startup ecosystem within their organization. Startups usually face difficulty with funding and finding clients. What will differentiate them from small startups would be their broad client base. They are working towards creating a client-centric design in order to shift from a hierarchical model to a network one.

Day 2: Atharva 2017: Lecture on ‘Overview of Security Markets’ by Mr. Bharat Dave, Manager, BSE

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In an informative session, Mr. Bharat Dave began by talking about the history of the 140-year-old Bombay Stock Exchange. He said it is India’s fastest exchange with 6 microsecond response time and highlighted the technology, products, and advantages of BSE.

The exchange can be utilized to earn returns from idle resources, beat inflation, reach financial goals and make provisions for an uncertain future. He explained how company, industry, and economy related news affect the stock market. He went on to teach the students of TAPMI some principles of safe investments which are as follows:

–    Diversify your investment into different sectors to generate wealth as per your goals

–    Don’t be greedy, have faith and patience

–    Avoid penny stocks

He explained position monitoring, circuit filters and surveillance system present in BSE to protect market participants. He further detailed the complaint redressal system against listed companies and trading members. The quasi-judicial mechanism in place ensures arbitrators appointed must resolve the issues in 6 months.

A recent initiative by BSE is the SME platform where currently 161 SME companies listed, benefits companies to access funds and generate visibility. Some of the investment strategies shared by him were regarding Systematic Investment Plan (SIP) and Systematic Transfer Plan (STP).

He concluded by saying you can become a millionaire and billionaire if you follow the rules and be a disciplined investor.

 

Day 5: ‘Heuristics in Modelling choice’ – Prof. Konstantinos Katsikopoulos, Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Germany

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This lecture discussed the prescriptive approach for decision making through the techniques of fast & frugal trees. This was demonstrated through two cases in the lecture. First, we addressed the question of whether the possibility of flagging banks at the risk of failing is reasonable. Using data, there was an improvisation on an existing tree by Aihman et al by including threshold values. Further, the logit models were discussed along with F&F models. It was also observed that the logit models were better than the F&F trees in terms of hit rate & false alarms. However, with less data, the results were reversed. F&F models are found to be better than the logit models.

Secondly, The case of NATO checkpoints in Afghanistan saw seven suicide attacks that caused a considerable number of civilian casualties. The idea here was to develop an F&F tree to minimise the casualties. Prof. Konstantinos explained that using a reasonably simple F&F tree, the number of casualties could have been possibly reduced by 40%. This was an interesting example that could be applied to a real life scenario.

Bounded Rationality, Day-4: ‘The Role of Empathy in Altruistic Behaviour: Evidence from Sequential Dictator Games’ – Prof.Sujoy Chakravarty, Professor (Economics), Jawaharlal Nehru University

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Prof. Sujoy Chakravarty, Professor of Economics at Jawaharlal Nehru University spoke about “The role of empathy in altruistic behaviour: Evidence from sequential dictator games.” He said that economics is a field that isn’t hijacked by crazy people, it is what we have. Even when a lot of things seem. To introduce the topic he differentiated between selfish and non-selfish motive. When it comes to warm glow or altruism, these are non-selfish behaviour. Whereas, reciprocity is a selfish behaviour but indirect reciprocity is more dependent on empathy and could be fuelled by empathy.

Prof. Chakravarty jokingly remarked that reciprocity is the oil that greases the wheel of capitalism. The concept specifies that an individual will be generous to another individual only when that individual has been good to him before. He talks about three types of reciprocity: downwards, upwards and indirect. He explained that in downstream reciprocity, “B helps A, C observes B. as a result C is more generous to B.” Whereas, in upstream reciprocity, “A helps B. B is more generous to C if has been generous to B.” But according to him, indirect reciprocity functions differently, it leads to an individual helping another one who has not interacted with him nor is there a chance of interacting with him in the future. According to Prof. Chakravarty, in indirect reciprocity “A helps B, this observed by C.  C will behave generously with B if A hasn’t.” In this case B gets two chances to play this game. C’s action will act as a compensation for A’s action.

Prof. Chakravarty has conducted his research on a large sample. He told the audience about the methodology of the study and how he has come to the conclusion of his research. He said the control conditions are empathy, randomness and information. His work is still underway and he said that he is still finding faults in his own research and trying to tease out other alternatives. He welcomed the audience to critique his work. It was an enriching and learning experience to go through the entire process o how the research is growing.